Law Practice Management Asked and Answered Blog

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July 2008

Jul 15, 2008


Is There a Number One Tip For Improving Law Firm Client Service

Question:

We recently completed an informal client survey and were surprised at some of the feedback. Our scores were lower than anticipated. Clients believe that our services took longer than expected and fees were also higher than expected. We work as dilligently as we can for our clients and I don't see how we can improve turnaround or reduce legal fees. Suggestions?

Response:

Based upon client surveys that we do for law firms we find that one of the biggest problems is that the attorneys are doing a poor job of managing client expectations. The key is to under promise and over deliver. I suspect that upon the initial client meeting you are under estimating the timeline and low balling the fee range. Increase the promise – timeline and fee range and then shoot to deliver under that range. This will do wonders for improving the client relationship.

John W. Olmstead, MBA, Ph.D, CMC

Jul 15, 2008


How Large Should a Law Firm Be When It Is Time to Hire an Administrator

Question:

How large should a firm be when it is time to hire an administrator?

Response:

There is no magic size. We just completed an engagement recruiting an administrator for a seven attorney firm. We also have law firm clients with over 40 attorneys that don’t have an administrator. I believe that an administrator, or office manager, is appropriate in firms of all sizes. It is a matter of attitude and commitment on the part of the partners and whether they are willing to delegate responsibility and authority to an administrator to run the day-to-day operations of the firm. The firm should start with a job description and then decide whether the firm is willing to delegate responsibility and authority. If not, the firm should not hire an administrator.

John W. Olmstead, MBA, Ph.D, CMC

Jul 15, 2008


How Do We Prepare Our Law Firm For a Merger

Question:

We are a 25 attorney firm and we are discussion the possibility of searching for merger partners? What is the process?

Response:

You start with determining your merger objectives. Why do you want to merge? What do you hope to achieve? Is merger compatible with your strategic plan? What size of firm are you considering?

Once you are sure that merger exploration – in general – makes sense – you should insure that your house is in order. In other words – can anything be done to enhance the value and/or marketability of your firm? For example:

  1. Do you have a business or strategic plan? If not – how will you convince a potential merger partner that you have a plan for the future and know where you are going? Maybe now is a good time to work on that plan.
  2. Work on and clean up your financials. Improve the financial performance of your practice. Eliminate deadwood. Writeoff uncollectable A/R and WIP.
  3. Avoid entering into long term committments that might make your firm undesirable to another firm. (new long term leases, risky client matters/cases, loans, admission of new partners, unfunded partner buyouts/retirements, etc.
  4. Enhance firm image where you can.
  5. Develop a first class firm profile.

Next, develop a merger marketing plan and begin working the plan. Try to generate enough leads that you can explore merger with several firms rather than engaging in "random merger talks" which often result in isolated merger offers with you having no framework for comparison.

Use an outside consulting firm if you need help organizing, identifying candidates, and managing the process.

Once you have merger candidates identified – the real work begins. Here is a general outline of the process:

Merger Accessment (Due Dilligence)

People

Philosophies, personalities, life styles, do the partners like each other, why does the deal make sense.

Firm Name
Conflicts
Economics
Partner Compensation System Comparisons
Retirement, Voluntary Withdrawl, Expulsion Policies
Management Structure
Practice Compability
Practice Philosophies
Work Ethic
Firm Structure
Associate Management

Merger Implementation

If the two firms decide to proceed with a merger – then the process of merger implementation begins. A merger agreement is executed and a merger implementation plan it put in place. Then you begin working the plan. If the merging firms are of similar size (as opposed to a large firm acquiring a smaller firm) a lot of infrastructure work will need to be done – ranging from IT systems, management structure, space, etc. to accomodate the larger entity.

John W. Olmstead, MBA, Ph.D, CMC

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